Programs of Other Organizations

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 

The AAAS-AMS Invited Address will be given by Philip Maini, University of Oxford, Are we there yet? Modelling collective cell motion in biology and medicine, Friday, at 11:10 am.

Association of Christians in the Mathematical Sciences (ACMS)

Association of Christians in the Mathematical Sciences (ACMS) Reception and Lecture, Thursday, 6:00–8:00 pm. The reception will take place between 6:00–7:00 pm, followed by a short program and 20-minute talk. Students are encouraged to attend.

Mathematicians of the African Diaspora (MAD)

Black Mathematicians Edit-A-Thon, organized by Edray Goins, Pomona College; Thursday, 8:00 am – 1:00 pm. The first African American to receive a doctorate in mathematics, Elbert Cox, did so in 1925; the first African American woman, Euphemia Haynes, in 1943. There are around 5000 Blacks who have earned a doctorate in the mathematical sciences. Until recently, there was no database of these individuals, their stories, or their work. This 5-hour session will provide space and training for students and faculty alike to (1) add biographies of Black mathematicians on Wikipedia, and (2) add biographies of Black mathematicians in the MAD Pages Database. Sign up for the event here.

National Security Agency (NSA)

National Security Agency Networking Event, Thursday, 6:00 - 8:00 pm, organized by Theresa Rahikka, NSA and co-organized by Diane Horn, NSA

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Sessions

NSF Session: How to Get Your DMS Proposal Declined, organized by Junping Wang, National Science Foundation, and Henry Warchall, Division of Mathematical Sciences, National Science Foundation; Thursday, 3:00 – 4:30 pm. NSF’s Division of Mathematical Sciences receives over 2500 research proposals each year. Anyone can give you advice on writing a good proposal – in this interactive game show, you'll learn some tips on how to do poorly!

NSF Education Programs in the Mathematical Sciences, organized by Mindy Capaldi, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation, Michael Ferrara, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation, John Haddock, National Science Foundation, Elise Lockwood, Division of Undergraduate Education, National Science Foundation, and Lee Zia, National Science Foundation; Friday, 10:30 am – 12:00 pm. A number of NSF divisions offer a variety of grant programs that promote innovations in learning and teaching and/or infrastructural support in the mathematical sciences. Following a short presentation about these programs, the remainder of the session will feature opportunities to engage in small group discussions with NSF staff about program features, current NSF policy changes, proposal preparation guidance, and other related topics.

Project NExT

Project NExT Workshop, Wednesday–Saturday, 8:00 am–6:00 pm.

Project NExT Lecture on Teaching, presented by Estrella Johnson, Virginia Tech, Title to be announced, Thursday, 11:10 am–12:00 pm.

Reception: TBD

Special Interest Groups of the MAA (SIGMAA)

SIGMAA on Business, Industry, and Government

JMM Panel: Mentoring Undergraduate Research in Data-Driven Research Projects, organized by Vinodh Chellamuthu, Utah Tech University, and Allison Henrich, Seattle University, Wednesday, 8:30–10:00 am. In recent years, data-driven undergraduate research projects and increasing collaboration with business, industry, and government (BIG) in undergraduate research have provided excellent opportunities for students and faculty mentors in terms of professional development and innovative undergraduate research opportunities. As this trend in these areas will grow and become more prominent in the undergraduate research community, it is necessary to address the unique challenges and benefits associated with mentoring students in BIG projects. In this session, panelists will address these challenges and benefits. For instance, how does research driven by BIG problems differ from traditional undergraduate research? How does working on BIG projects help students develop the skills necessary for the demanding job market? How do problems from industry lead to new and interesting mathematics? Panelists are Michael Dorff, Brigham Young University, Diana Thomas, United States Military Academy, Mark Ward, Purdue University, and Suzanne Weekes, SIAM. This panel is sponsored by the SIGMAA on Business, Industry, and Government.

SIGMAA on Environmental Mathematics (SIGMAA EM)

JMM Workshop on Math for Sustainability: Quantitative and Ethical Reasoning in General Education Mathematics, organized by Russ deForest, Pennsylvania State University; Wednesday, 1:00–3:00 pm. Would you rather learn the quadratic equation or would you rather save the world? For many students in non-technical majors, college algebra serves as a (sometimes dreaded) "terminal math course." Math for Sustainability is a capstone general education math course offered at Penn State that engages students in a quantitative approach to sustainability questions. Students are introduced to sophisticated mathematical ideas in a context requiring minimal mathematical background, build their skills in quantitative reasoning, and are empowered to engage with and create quantitative arguments addressing issues they are passionate about.

We view quantitative and ethical reasoning as part of a broader set of essential skills for citizens who are prepared to be engaged in sustainability questions and we develop mathematical topics in the course with this purpose in mind. This workshop will introduce participants to course content and engage participants in examples of active learning. We will discuss an integrated ethical framework and demonstrate its use fostering student-centered discussions of ethical issues that connect naturally with course topics. Participants will be provided with course materials that may be adapted for lessons in general education and lower-division mathematics courses, including a copy of our textbook, Mathematics for Sustainability, Springer (2018), example assignments and rubrics, syllabi, and an extensive collection of problems and in-class activities. Sponsored by SIGMAA on Environmental Mathematics.

Lightning Talks in Environmental Mathematics, organized by Russ deForest, Pennsylvania State University; Thursday, 6:00–7:00 pm. Students! Pitch your work in environmental mathematics in a 3 minute "elevator talk" during this lightning talk session hosted by SIGMAA EM. Participating students will give three-minute, one-slide talks highlighting their work in environmental mathematics. Prizes will be awarded based on multiple categories. This 60 minute session will preceed the SIGMAA EM Reception and Guest Speaker.

SIGMAA on Environmental Mathematics Guest Lecture and Reception, Thursday 7:00–8:30 pm.

SIGMAA on the Philosophy of Mathematics

SIGMAA on the Philosophy of Mathematics Guest Lecture, organized by Bonnie Gold, Monmouth University, and Jeff Buechner, Rutgers University; Friday, 6:00–7:30 pm. Russell Marcus, Hamilton College, Title to be announced

SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research

JMM Panel: A DEI Perspective on Undergraduate Research, organized by Vinodh Chellamuthu, Utah Tech University, and Allison Henrich, Seattle University, Wednesday, 10:30 am–12:00 pm. Panelists are Rebecca Garcia, Sam Houston State University, Edray Goins, Pomona College, and Pamela Harris, Williams College. As we continue to respond to the damaging effects of the pandemic and persistent inequities in our educational system, the need for the math community to create more inclusive, supportive environments for our student researchers feels more urgent than it ever has. While many faculty mentors are eager to adapt their mentoring practices to help their students thrive, they may be unsure of how to get started. A panel of successful undergraduate research mentors will share their insights around fostering a diverse, equitable, and inclusive research environment. They will also share concrete strategies that participants can incorporate into their own undergraduate research mentoring. This panel is sponsored by the SIGMAA on Undergraduate Research.

Women in Mathematics Society (WiMS)

National Security Agency Networking Event, Thursday, 6:00 - 8:00 pm, organized by Theresa Rahikka, NSA and co-organized by Diane Horn, NSA

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